Working through local partners in South Sudan

Tuesday, July 09, 2024
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Participants standing holding the cash assistance they received.

As we're addressing food insecurity through this cash program, we're training others, and we are really proud of that.

Belachew Germamo, Jonglei area coordinator for LWF South Sudan

In South Sudan, Lutheran World Federation (LWF) South Sudan (local partner of Canadian Lutheran World Relief (CLWR)) is working to provide food assistance through cash transfers.

In Jonglei State, South Sudan, increased climate impacts such as flooding and drought, as well as conflict and cattle raiding, have contributed to more than half of the population now facing crisis levels of hunger.

“Because of these events, the community’s resilience is tested or challenged repeatedly,” says Belachew Germamo, Jonglei area coordinator for LWF South Sudan. “When they try to settle, another scenario comes in.”

According to the Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC), in late 2023 the food security situation in Twic East county was projected to be at crisis levels (IPC3), while Duk county was expected to be at emergency levels (IPC4).

In the midst of this hardship, LWF South Sudan is committed to doing all they can to help families thrive – especially those who are internally displaced, returnees, or host community households.

“We try to balance the vulnerable households based on their assets and what they’re doing, and we look for those who are the most vulnerable. It takes a lot of process, but that is what we are doing.”

Three project participants standing and holding the cash assistance they received.

The latest cash distribution is one of a series of food assistance responses the Foodgrains Bank has funded through LWF South Sudan in Jonglei State, with support from our member CLWR. (Photo: LWF South Sudan)

Between October 2023 and February 2024, LWF South Sudan provided direct cash transfers to meet the needs of 1,545 of the most vulnerable households (around 7,800 individuals) in both counties.

For these families, direct cash is the preferred form of assistance for the community, says Belachew. “With direct cash, the families can choose what food they want to eat when everything isn’t fine.”

His team is proud of the way they’ve been able to work within the community, fostering an open dialogue on previously undiscussed matters as the community’s trust has grown.

“As we’re addressing food insecurity through this cash program, we’re training others, and we are really proud of that.”

While the Foodgrains Bank supports LWF’s food assistance response, other funding sources have helped them invest in resiliency building and development, says Belachew. “The way LWF integrates education, protection, and food security, is greatly appreciated by the community.”

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