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Sermon Starter: Isaiah 25

“Unlike today, rich food was not an everyday staple in that time and place. People ate simply, and most people could enjoy meat only occasionally. Typically, they would eat a light meal at midday and a larger meal at the end of the work day. Bread was the staple food—vegetables are mentioned only occasionally in the Old Testament. People raised olives for oil, and enjoyed grapes, both fresh and dried (raisins), as well as wine made from grapes. ‘Rich food filled with marrow’ and ‘well-aged wines strained clear’ would be rare and prized…. Kings and other wealthy people could serve lavish banquets, but only for their closest friends and associates. Even a king as rich as Solomon could not afford to host a grand banquet for ‘all peoples’—nor would a king be inclined to do so if he could. Great banquets were one of the things that distinguished kings from common people, and kings are always interested in maintaining those kinds of distinctions.

But the feast mentioned in this verse is not a banquet hosted by an ordinary family. It isn’t even a banquet hosted by a king. It is a banquet hosted by ‘Yahweh of Armies’—the one who created all that is—the one who owns the cattle on a thousand hills (Psalm 50:10). The Lord of hosts can afford to serve the finest foods and wines from beginning to end. The Lord of hosts can afford to provide fine foods for ‘all peoples’ — and that is exactly what the Lord of hosts intends to do.”

~ Excerpts from a commentary by Richard Niell Donovan on Sermon Writer. Read more here.

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