Canada’s support for world’s most vulnerable people needed now more than ever

Friday, October 04, 2019
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Beneficiaries gather their food aid and prepare to carry it home. 50kg bags of sorghum soon divided up amongst their community group and carried home in what can many hours of walking. Adventist Relief and Development Agency Canada is supporting Adventist Relief and Development Agency South Sudan with a three-month food assistance project Kapoeta North County in Eastern Equatoria State, South Sudan. Food insecurity in this region is at unprecedented levels due to the ongoing political crisis in South Sudan that has displaced hundreds of thousands of civilians and devastated the country’s economy including agricultural production. Two consecutive years of drought have further exacerbated the situation by causing total crop failures in many regions. Finding other sources of food is almost next to impossible for families and individuals living in these areas due to high commodity and food prices that most cannot afford. This project will meet immediate household food needs of 2,250 households (approximately 13,500 individuals) in this area by delivering 3 monthly emergency food baskets containing sorghum, beans, vegetable oil and iodized salt. In total, the project will utilize 205.13 tonnes of sorghum, 22.79 tonnes of beans, 13.67 tonnes of oil and 4.56 tonnes of salt.

Now is the time to do more, not less. Canada has an important role to play in addressing global hunger”

Canadian Foodgrains Bank executive director Jim Cornelius. (Photo: Matthew Sawatzky)

Foodgrains Bank continues to support an increase in Canadian aid as global hunger rises

It’s important now more than ever that Canada supports efforts to reduce hunger and poverty around the world and contributes to a more stable and peaceful world.

After decades of progress, global hunger began rising again in 2015. Increased conflict around the world and erratic weather patterns are key causes.

“Now is the time to do more, not less. Canada has an important role to play in addressing global hunger,” says Canadian Foodgrains Bank executive director Jim Cornelius. “We are blessed in this country and have the opportunity to share our abundance with others. Canada can and should support initiatives to address poverty abroad as well as here in Canada. It is both a moral imperative and in our national interest.”

At a time when the world is becoming increasingly unstable, Canadian aid supports a more secure, safe and prosperous world. That’s good for Canadians, and good for all people.

Canadian aid makes a significant impact in the lives of people living in poverty around the world. For example, aid from Canada and elsewhere has supported Rwanda, which emerged from the horrific genocide 25 years ago and has made huge strides in social and economic development since then. South Korea, Thailand and Vietnam have all reduced poverty, nearly eliminated hunger and built vibrant economies—with important support from aid in the past.

“At a time when the world is becoming increasingly unstable, Canadian aid supports a more secure, safe and prosperous world. That’s good for Canadians, and good for all people,” says Cornelius.

“In my travels, I have personally seen how the programs of the Foodgrains Bank and other agencies, funded by Canada’s aid program, help ensure desperate Syrian refugees in Lebanon and Jordan have enough food to eat,” he says. “Our programs support families displaced by conflict in Colombia, reach Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh who have been forced from their homes in Myanmar, provide agricultural training to low-income farmers in Nicaragua, and respond to cyclones and flooding in India. On paper, these countries would be considered middle-income, but the programs of our agency and others support the most vulnerable families there and elsewhere.”

Canadian Foodgrains Bank has long been urging the Canadian government to invest more in aid. The Foodgrains Bank’s I Care campaign encourages Canadians to demonstrate their support for a more compassionate and generous Canada. So far, more than 22,000 Canadians have sent postcards to the Prime Minister asking for more investments in ending global poverty and hunger.

“We know Canadians care about this issue,” says Cornelius. “In a survey of more than 1,000 Foodgrains Bank supporters last year, more than 99 percent said they believe it is important for Canada to contribute to international assistance. Nearly 80 percent said Canada is not doing enough to reduce hunger and poverty around the world. They sent a clear message that Canada can and should do more.”

To learn more about how you can support this message, visit www.foodgrainsbank.ca/advocate

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