Fourteen projects totaling $3.7 million committed in November

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Canadian Foodgrains Bank committed 14 projects in November, including a project through Canadian Baptist Ministries that is providing food rations to 3,400 people in South Sudan whose lives have been disrupted by conflict. (Photo: Matthew Sawatzky)

Over 142,000 people in ten countries will benefit; includes emergency responses in South Sudan and northern Nigeria

Over 142,000 people in ten countries will benefit from fourteen projects totaling $3.7 million committed by Canadian Foodgrains Bank in November.

The projects are being implemented by Foodgrains Bank members ADRA Canada, Canadian Baptist Ministries, Emergency Relief and Development Overseas (ERDO), Mennonite Central Committee Canada, Presbyterian World Service & Development and World Renew, in collaboration with their local partners.

One project, through Canadian Baptist Ministries, is responding to the needs of people in Upper Nile State, South Sudan.

Violent conflict in South Sudan has led to severe hunger throughout much of the country, including the declaration of famine in parts of South Sudan for several months in the spring. At that time, the flood of South Sudanese refugees into Uganda was the largest refugee crisis in the world.

In Melut Payam, the region of Upper Nile State where Canadian Baptist Ministries is responding through their partner Faith Evangelical Baptist Church, security is slowly improving, and some people are returning home. After many years away, their past homes and belongings have been looted or destroyed.

This project, which totals $287,000, is providing 3,400 people with rations of sorghum, maize, flour, lentils and oil as they return home and work to rebuild their lives.

Through another project, Foodgrains Bank member World Renew is providing emergency support to families in northern Nigeria who have fled the chaos and destruction of militant group Boko Haram.

The ongoing violence means people are unable to access their farmland.

The region is already poor, and with people unable to access their homes and livelihoods, hunger in the region is widespread.

Through the project, 1,400 displaced households (about 8,000 people) will receive cash each month they can use to purchase the food they need in local markets.

Other projects committed in November include:

  • An agriculture and livelihoods project in Ethiopia through Mennonite Central Committee Canada, totaling $89,000 and benefitting 38,000 people.
  • An agriculture and livelihoods project in Ethiopia through Mennonite Central Committee Canada, totaling $203,000 and benefitting 28,000 people.
  • An agriculture and livelihoods project in Ethiopia through Mennonite Central Committee Canada, totaling $160,000 and benefitting 6,000 people.
  • A food assistance project in Kenya through World Renew, totaling $491,000 and benefitting 16,600 people.
  • A food assistance project in Kenya through Mennonite Central Committee Canada, totaling $186,000 and benefitting 7,000 people.
  • An agriculture and livelihoods project in Kenya through ADRA Canada, totaling $409,000 and benefitting 5,000 people.
  • An agriculture and livelihoods project in Lesotho through Mennonite Central Committee Canada, totaling $158,000 and benefitting 7,000 people.
  • A food assistance and agriculture and livelihoods project in Madagascar through World Renew, totaling $590,000 and benefitting 7,000 people.
  • An agriculture and livelihoods project in Malawi through Presbyterian World Service & Development, totaling $110,000 and benefitting 2,500 people.
  • An agriculture and livelihoods project in Pakistan through Presbyterian World Service & Development, totaling $386,000 and benefitting 3,600 people.
  • An agriculture and livelihoods project in Somalia through Emergency Relief and Development Overseas, totaling $89,000 and benefitting 38,000 people.
  • An agriculture and livelihoods project in Zimbabwe of Mennonite Central Committee Canada, totaling $158,000 and benefitting 4,000 people.

Projects supported by Canadian Foodgrains Bank are undertaken with support from the Government of Canada.

–Amanda Thorsteinsson, Communications Coordinator