Digging Deep on Soil Health: Farmers, agronomists invited to learning event with African agronomists on state of world’s soils

Wednesday, June 19, 2019

Register for the Global Forum on Soil Stewardship today!


“This will be a fantastic opportunity for Canadians, both rural and urban, and current and future supporters to step into the world of food security and the link to a healthy and productive soil,” says Dr. Martin Entz of the University of Manitoba Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences.

Canadian farmers, agronomists, and anyone with an interest in global soil health and the challenges of protecting the world’s soils are invited to Carman, Manitoba on July 25 and 26.

Ten specialists working on Canadian Foodgrains Bank-supported projects in Kenya, Tanzania, Malawi and Ethiopia have been invited for a Global Forum on Soil Stewardship.

“We’re excited to welcome agronomists from our network in East Africa to Canada, many of them for the first time, and for the rich conversations and learning we expect between people who care deeply about soil health around the world,” says Theresa Rempel Mulaire, who manages the Scaling-Up Conservation Agriculture program on behalf of the Foodgrains Bank.

The two days will include site visits on research being done at the Carman research facility on soil health led by Dr. Martin Entz and other colleagues of the University of Manitoba Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences.

The first day is focused more on farming and agronomy, while the second day is focused more generally on soil care, faith, food and agriculture.

“This is a unique event,” says Entz. “I believe this will be a fantastic opportunity for Canadians, both rural and urban, and current and future supporters to step into the world of food security and the link to a healthy and productive soil.”

Topics to be explored include soil health and protection, how they relate to care for the environment, and what these topics mean for ending global hunger.

The specialists who the Foodgrains Bank has invited to take part in this learning exchange are all working in their home countries through projects that train farmers to improve their crop production.

Around the world, many of the people who regularly experience hunger farm on small plots of land. Despite their hard work, they may go hungry as their farms are too small to easily meet their need for food; they often work with degraded soil in harsh and unpredictable weather conditions; they struggle with government instability, and getting their crops to market and they may lack income and training to improve their farms.

Registration for the event is free, and there is some assistance available to help with travel costs.

For more information and to register, visit foodgrainsbank.ca/soil

–Amanda Thorsteinsson, Communications Coordinator